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FACE MASK PARADE


Welcome to our Face Mask Parade showcasing members face masks. The group have been very active producing various styles of masks for personal use and distributing them amongst family and friends. One member, Robin Blakely, was particularly busy making over 30 masks for school teachers at a local school.


At our last Zoom meeting there was much discussion regarding the care and maintenance of our masks especially with regard to washing. It was thought that warm soapy water was best though this of course would depend on the fabric used in construction. One member did suggest that an alternative manner in which to sterilise your mask could be to steam iron; as my masks are felted this is what I have done in the first instance.


Of particular concern was what was happening to all the disposable masks being used highlighting the importance of producing our own reusable supply. However, it would seem important to use the correct materials and for this reason I am reproducing the Department of Human Services, Victoria, design and preparation of cloth mask guidelines which should help those of us who are not quite sure how to proceed:


Design and preparation of cloth mask

To make this cloth mask you will need:

Component Quantity and dimensions Material type Example materials 1 piece, 25 cm x 25 cm Water-resistant fabric (polyester/polypropylene) 1 piece, 25 cm x 25 cm Fabric blends (cotton polyester blend/ polypropylene) 1 piece, 25 cm x 25 cm Water absorbing fabric (cotton)

Outer Middle Inner Ear loops 2 pieces, 20 cm each Elastic or string or cloth strips

  • Clothing

  • Reusable ‘green’ shopping bags

  • Active wear (quick dry)

A repeat layer of:

  • clothing or

  • reusable ‘green’ shopping bags

  • Clothing

  • T-shirt

  • Shoelaces


IMPORTANT: Make sure that all materials are intact and have not worn too thin or have approximate and sized for an average adult. Steps A. Cutout three 25cm×25cm squares of each fabric. These will form the outer, middle and inner layers.


  1. Fold over 1 cm of material for the top and bottom hems and stitch (see red dotted lines).

  2. Foldover1.5cmofmaterial for the side hems and stitch (see red dotted lines).

  3. Runa20cmlengthof elastic, string or cloth strips through the wider hem on each side. Use a safety pin or large needle to thread it through.

  4. Knot the ends tightly or stitch them together.

Design and preparation of cloth mask 2


  1. Wear the mask carefully so that the mask fits your face. While wearing do not touch the outer layer.

  2. If you want to improve the fit of your mask you can add a nylon stocking over the mask and tie at the back of the head.

To receive this document in another format email Public Health branch <public.health@dhhs.vic.gov.au>. Authorised and published by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne. © State of Victoria, Australia, Department of Health and Human Services, 11 July 2020 (2001628). Available at: DHHS.vic – coronavirus disease (COVID-19) <

<https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/coronavirus>


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I have copied the above document from a PDF file so that the actual illustration of mask production has not reproduced, therefore, it would be best to download if required from web site above.


M A S K P A R A D E


Glenda Beresford


Glenda said that whilst she was in Leongatha she saw someone with a stretchy mask and decided to give that a go. Using some ribbing from her stash and lining with two layers of silk chiffon, she managed to make a very comfortable mask that doesn’t fog your glasses.  Good for walking and exercising.

Explanation of construction - the ribbing and lining are both rectangles. The lining is a double layer of chiffon, though Glenda reports it doesn’t absorb moisture very well.  The lining rectangles are about half the size of the ribbing. She stitched lining and ribbing together along top and bottom with right sides together. After turning right side through to the outside, she pleated the sides and stitched them in place.



For this mask Glenda followed member Noelle’s idea of a tab and button at the back and that worked well.







Noelle Walker


Noelle has produced a large quantity of masks which are shown in the title photo to this post. However, there are some more detailed examples of her designs here:














Christine Heward


Christine has shown her work in progress then the finished result:












Heidi Norman


Heidi has been experiencing some ill health recently which has kept her away from participating in the group so I am glad to welcome her back. She has made masks with wire in the nose section making for a snug fit.












Barb Mewburn


This mask has a centre front seam and wire in the nose



The second style shown from Barb is from a 'duck bill' pattern


















Janet Staben

Janet's masks are modelled on a teddy bear from two thicknesses of heavyweight cotton. Janet says she copied the design from a Youtube video.






Robin Blakely


Although Robin has made a large quantity of masks for local school teachers, she has found time to make her own plus some for pets !



















Luana Sloss


Luana reports that she has given all the pretty ones she made away to friends and family and kept the daggy ones. Her photo certainly doesn't look 'daggy'.




















June Gregory


June's mask reflects her like of cacti:
























Gwen Brown


Gwen didn't have a mask photo to share with us but she sent in a picture of a super idea for a fastening behind the head. Many of us are finding the elastic uncomfortable or not a good fit so these crocheted fittings are a good alternative.




Finally here's my offering in nuno felting, lined with silk and backed with a pretty pink cotton which has been in my odds and ends material box since I made a dress with it for my granddaughter 14 years ago.



I also added some sparkles when felting.













Thank you so much to those who have participated. It's been quite a job collating all the photos for this parade as they came to me on different mediums i.e. e-mail, text and messenger and needed to be put into the edit gallery of the web site. There have been some really super masks produced by you all, so well done and enjoy this parade.






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